Voices Of Sexuality – Educational Resource

Inclusive Practice (15 YouTube clips with prompt questions and added resources)

Teaching strategies to support cultural diversity in the classroom

Prompt Questions
  • Story telling is a key strategy identified in this video clip. Develop a story and inquiry questions focused on one of the following issues: sexual consent, STI’s, Body image.
  • ‘Shame’ is raised as a key issue. What strategies can be used in sexuality education to assist young people to deal with shame?
  • The use of a translator is suggested. What would be the advantages and disadvantages to the use of a translator?
  • What practical suggestions does Chiedza Malungahave for creating an inclusive classroom for students from a range of cultural backgrounds?
Other Useful Resources

Centre for Culture, Ethnicity and Health, Multicultural Sexual Health Network – A range of resources available from their website

Promoting sexual health amongst resettled youth with refugee backgrounds. McMichael, C. (2008) Melbourne: Refugee Health Research Centre

‘It is good to know now . . . before it’s too late’: Promoting sexual health literacy amongst resettled young people with refugee backgrounds. McMichael, C. and Gifford, S. (2009) Sexuality & Culture 13(4): 218-237

Narratives of sexual health risk and protection amongst young people from refugee backgrounds in Melbourne, Australia. McMichael & Gifford (2010) Culture, health and sexuality, 12(3): 263-77 (Abstract available)

Cultural diversity in the classroom

Prompt Questions
  • Zabaidah challenges the notion of consulting with one cultural leader about the sexuality education program. How do you treat every student and family as individuals as well as respecting the broader cultural expectations?
  • How can you acknowledge and affirm all students in your classroom – from those who intend not to have sex to those that are sexually active -in both the content of the program and the language you use?
Other Useful Resources

Centre for Culture, Ethnicity and Health, Multicultural Sexual Health Network – A range of resources available from their website

Cultural and religious difference in sexuality education

Prompt Questions
  • Mary Lou Rasmussen introduces the concept of ‘sexularism’. Reflect on this concept by drawing on your experience in schools?
  • Is sexuality education value free? How do you enable a range of values to be expressed in the classroom?
  • How do we ensure that the story telling pedagogy is not used in a way to privilege or silence particular students and result in negative consequences for students?
Other Useful Resources

Pleasure/desire, sexularism and sexuality education, Rasmussen, M.L., 2014

In Search of Critical Pedagogy in Sexuality Education: Visions, Imaginations, and Paradoxes Fida Sanjakdar, Louisa Allen, Mary Lou Rasmussen, Kathleen Quinlivan, Annette Brömdal & Clive Aspin. Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies Volume 37, Issue 1, 2015 pages 53-70

Nothing for them: Understanding the support needs of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) young people from refugee and newly arrived backgrounds. Noto, Leonard, & Mitchell (2014)

Culturally diverse families

Prompt Questions
  • Many people have talked about the role of aunts, uncles, extended family and community as responsible for sexuality education. How can you involve them in the school program?
  • The language we use to describe sexuality education can be challenging or misunderstood by parents and carers. What were some of the concerns expressed? Do we need an alternative language to describe sexuality education? What would be the advantages and disadvantages?

Rural young people and their communities

Prompt Questions
  • How can living in a rural area impact on a young person’s experience of sexuality education and access to services and support?
  • As a teacher in a rural school, how would you design your sexuality education curriculum with the rural context in mind?
Other Useful Resources

It’s That Easy: What’s involved in a sexual health check-up – YouTube clips that portrays the experience of two young people who visit a rural sexual health clinic

Sexuality education in the rural context

Prompt Questions
  • What are some of the barriers for students in rural areas to accessing sexual and reproductive health services and supports?
  • Are these issues also relevant for young people in other contexts? Consider how the relevance changes in a rural context? Could they also be protective factors?
  • Research examples of young people’s actions to improve sexual health related services. Identify what were enablers in these cases.
  • What teaching activities can you develop to support students to identify and critically assess both their local services and supports, and services beyond their immediate locality?
Other Useful Resources

Exploring the acceptability of online sexually transmissible infection testing for rural young people in Victoria. Tomnay, JE, Bourke L, and Fairley CK.  Aust. J. Rural Health (2014)22, 40–44

Council-supported condom vending machines: are they acceptable to rural communities? Tomnay JE and Hatch B. Sexual Health (2013) 10, 456-466

 

What parents say about sexuality education

Prompt Questions
  • Jenny Walsh suggests that we “don’t need to get permission (from parents) but we need to inform them”. What are a range of ways you could communicate with parents and carers about your sexuality education program?
  • How would this be achieved in a diverse school setting, an isolated school, etc.?
Other Useful Resources

‘Talk Soon Talk Often’ – A free resource has been developed to help parents initiate regular and relaxed conversations with their children about sexuality and relationships.

Parents and Carers perspective about sexuality education

Prompt Questions
  • What concerns or questions do parents and carers have about their own children’s sexual development?
  • What strategies can you put in place to alleviate parental concerns?

Disability, sexuality and relationships

Prompt Questions
  • What challenges do students with a disability face when accessing sexuality education?
  • What challenges may teachers face when providing sexuality education to students with a disability and what ways can you overcome these?
Other Useful Resources

All About Sex – A series of fact sheets from Family Planning NSW for people with an intellectual disability and the people who support them.

Students with an intellectual disability

Prompt Questions
  • What are the common themes that emerge as the three peer educators reflect back on their experience of sexuality education?
  • What attitudes and beliefs would they like changed? What is the implication for how we work with students in schools?
Other Useful Resources

Talking to children with cognitive disabilities – Family Planning Victoria, Melbourne

Enabling Health: Taking action to improve the health of people with a disability – produced by Victorian Health Promotion Foundation (VicHealth) includes a case study of the Living Safer Sexual Lives: Respectful Relationships Peer Educators based in Bendigo.

Students with a disability

Prompt Questions
  • What is the key message that Ariane is emphasizing about sexuality education and students with physical disabilities, or any disabilities for that matter?
  • ‘The idea of ‘co-educate’ is raised by Ariane. What does she mean in relation to sexuality education? What strategies could facilitate this process in mainstream schools?
Other Useful Resources

Information sheet about puberty and Autism Disorders created by Amaze (formally Autism Victoria)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and community

Prompt Questions
  • What culturally appropriate teaching methodologies and styles were mentioned that you could you utilize in the classroom?
  • What does Kaminjarr want teachers to focus on in sexuality education classes? Is this only relevant for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students or relevant for all students?
  • Who would you talk to in your community/region about Aboriginal culture?
Other Useful Resources

Smart and Deadly – Six short educational YouTube clips and two rap songs developed by the Aboriginal young people and organisations in Northeast Victoria

The Torres Indigenous Hip Hop Project: evaluating the use of performing arts as a medium for sexual health promotion. McEwan A, Crouch A, Robertson H and Fagan P. Health Promotion Journal of Australia

Supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families

Prompt Questions
  • What strategies are identified by Aunty Vera Briggs to ensure an appropriate approach?
  • Aunty Vera talks about the importance of links – link to home, links to the community. How could you develop these in a mainstream school? What research and liaison would you need to carry out?
  • Aunty Vera also talks about the need to speak to the kids – are there any cultural considerations if you were undertaking this in practice?
Other Useful Resources

Smart and Deadly – Six short educational YouTube clips and two rap songs developed by the Aboriginal young people and organisations in Northeast Victoria

Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) – Sexual Health resources available

Same sex attracted and gender diverse students and families

Prompt Questions
  • Are there similarities in the themes identified by the young people?
  • What do they say about their sexuality education in schools?
  • Why is Rhys’s experience so different to the other young people?
  • Rhys maintains that sexuality is socially constructed. Describe how you would teach this to a group of year 8 students using narrative pedagogies.
  • Were you challenged by any of the issues raised in this clip? Why? How can we help other pre-services teachers to understand and build inclusive practice in sexuality education?
Other Useful Resources

Safe School Coalition – Resources for students, staff and parents on challenging discrimination and creating more inclusive schools

The Freedom Stories is a series of short films launched by ReachOut and ACON

Making sexuality education safer and more inclusive for same sex attracted, intersex and gender diverse young people

Prompt Questions
  • What can assist schools to be inclusive in their sexuality education practice?
  • What are some ways you might challenge homophobic and transphobic behaviour and language that does not make students ashamed and helps them reflect and learn?
  • Can you identify ways in which teachers may inadvertently be heterosexist in a sexuality education program and can you identify strategies to tackle this?
  • Roz Ward talked about an inclusive school environment beyond the sexuality education program. What ways do you envisage that you can contribute to this?
Other Useful Resources

Safe School Coalition – Resources for students, staff and parents on challenging discrimination and creating more inclusive schools

Writing themselves In 3: The third national study on the sexual health and wellbeing of same sex attracted and gender questioning young people

The following organisations and committees (in alphabetical order) collaborated on the project: Albury Wodonga Aboriginal Health Service (AWAHS); Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health & Society, La Trobe University; Barwon Health; Bendigo Community Health Services; Brophy Family Youth Services; Deakin University; Golden City Support Services; La Trobe University; Loddon Campaspe Centre Against Sexual  Assault; Monash University; Multicultural Health Support Services, Centre for Culture, Ethnicity & Health; Northern Bay P-12 College; Sexuality Education Matters Steering Committee; UnitingCare Cutting Edge; Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO);  Victorian Aboriginal Education Association Incorporated (VAEAI)